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Informing the Cancer Reform Strategy 

Informing the Cancer Reform Strategy

The Client

Macmillan Cancer Support and UK Department of Health
 

The Need

Due to growth in cancer survivorship and subsequent resource limitations, the UK position of follow-up services was unsustainable. Alternative models to traditional hospital aftercare required consideration in terms of clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness.

The Action

An update was made to ‘Evidence to Inform the Cancer Reform Strategy: The Clinical Effectiveness of Follow-Up Services after Treatment for Cancer’ (Centre for Reviews and Dissemination) using a number of quality-controlled databases and correspondence with experts to identify ongoing initiatives.

The Outcome

Primary and secondary research highlighted a shift towards patient empowerment via individualised and group education programmes aimed at increasing survivor’s ability to better manage their condition and the effects of treatment. The role of specialist nurses as key facilitators of supportive aftercare was emphasised, along with a move towards technology-based aftercare in the form of telephone or web-based services. These findings led to further work on the development of guidance for personalised aftercare interventions.

“Nicola’s superb research skills and understanding of cancer survivorship needs informed the Cancer Reform Strategy. In particular, key areas of unmet need were identified and potential solutions proposed.”

– National Cancer Survivorship Project Manager

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Nicola’s superb research skills and understanding of cancer survivorship needs informed the Cancer Reform Strategy. In particular, key areas of unmet need were identified and potential solutions proposed.

– National Cancer Survivorship Project Manager

The client

Macmillan Cancer Support and UK Department of Health

The need

Due to growth in cancer survivorship and subsequent resource limitations, the UK position of follow-up services was unsustainable. Alternative models to traditional hospital aftercare required consideration in terms of clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness.

The action

An update was made to ‘Evidence to Inform the Cancer Reform Strategy: The Clinical Effectiveness of Follow-Up Services after Treatment for Cancer’ (Centre for Reviews and Dissemination) using a number of quality-controlled databases and correspondence with experts to identify ongoing initiatives.
Primary and secondary research highlighted a shift towards patient empowerment via individualised and group education programmes aimed at increasing survivor’s ability to better manage their condition and the effects of treatment. The role of specialist nurses as key facilitators of supportive aftercare was emphasised, along with a move towards technology-based aftercare in the form of telephone or web-based services. These findings led to further work on the development of guidance for personalised aftercare interventions.

The outcome