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Guidance for developing supported self-management interventions for cancer survivors

Guidance for developing supported self-management interventions for cancer survivors

The Client

Macmillan Cancer Support, UK Department of Health, and University of Southampton

The Need

With increasing cancer survivorship came the increasing need for post-treatment support, particularly self-management support. Supported self-management interventions were being rolled out across the nation, necessitating a standardised, evidence-based intervention protocol.

The Action

Research assessing cancer-specific self-management support services for survivors of the four most common tumour sites (breast; colorectal; lung; prostate) was conducted to synthesise evidence of intervention success factors. Evidence synthesis comprised an examination of external and internal resources, resulting in a 3-level supported self-management development structure comprising typology, delivery and techniques.

The Outcome

A guidance document was produced and distributed to hospitals and cancer service providers outlining an evidence-based methodology for the development and implementation of supported self-management support. The guidance illuminated a process of: a needs assessment plan, determining intervention typology, selecting a theoretical framework, an intervention delivery strategy, selecting intervention techniques, activating an implementation plan, and ongoing evaluation. Key stakeholder outcomes to consider were also provided, including patient, clinician, commissioner, and policymaker outcomes.

“Implementing self-management programmes for cancer survivors was proving successful, but it became clear that different institutions may need unique approaches to implementation. By devising a standardised protocol with elements of customisability, Nicola helped make the implementation of these programmes accessible to all.” – National Cancer Survivorship Project Manager
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Implementing self-management programmes for cancer survivors was proving successful, but it became clear that different institutions may need unique approaches to implementation. By devising a standardised protocol with elements of customisability, Nicola helped make the implementation of these programmes accessible to all.

– National Cancer Survivorship Project Manager

The client

Macmillan Cancer Support, UK Department of Health, and University of Southampton

The need

With increasing cancer survivorship came the increasing need for post-treatment support, particularly self-management support. Supported self-management interventions were being rolled out across the nation, necessitating a standardised, evidence-based intervention protocol.

The action

Research assessing cancer-specific self-management support services for survivors of the four most common tumour sites (breast; colorectal; lung; prostate) was conducted to synthesise evidence of intervention success factors. Evidence synthesis comprised an examination of external and internal resources, resulting in a 3-level supported self-management development structure comprising typology, delivery and techniques.
A guidance document was produced and distributed to hospitals and cancer service providers outlining an evidence-based methodology for the development and implementation of supported self-management support. The guidance illuminated a process of: a needs assessment plan, determining intervention typology, selecting a theoretical framework, an intervention delivery strategy, selecting intervention techniques, activating an implementation plan, and ongoing evaluation. Key stakeholder outcomes to consider were also provided, including patient, clinician, commissioner, and policymaker outcomes.

The outcome